HOW DOES CBD OIL WORK TO MANAGE PAIN?

Cannabidiol (CBD) exhibits many potent and positive effects on the health of the body, one which we frequently hear of is its ability to reduce pain. It has multiple healing properties in many areas within the body due to its ability to bind to our cells. CBD oil is used by some people with chronic pain and many people report a reduction in pain, inflammation and overall discomfort when using CBD oil. This is highly positive feedback as it means for many, also a reduction in pain medication and a drastic improvement in their wellbeing (mobility, lifestyle, happiness).

What does this mean?

Researchers believe that CBD interacts with receptors in your brain and immune system. Receptors are tiny proteins attached to your cells that receive chemical signals from different stimuli and help your cells respond. This creates anti-inflammatory and painkilling effects that help with pain management. This means that CBD oil may benefit people with chronic pain, such as chronic back pain.

How does it work to reduce pain and inflamamtion?

CBD oil helps ease pain by attaching to the body’s natural cannabidinoid receptor sites in the brain. These sites, when unlocked, help decrease pain levels and reduce inflammation within the body. The Neurotransmitters (hormonal communication system) in the body is firing all day every day and chemical compounds such as inflammatory mediators (interleukin, prostaglandins) work to create disharmony of these pathways. CBD oil effectively works to down regulate the production of inflammation by working to create positive cellular changes. It can also be likened to a agonist in a sense because it helps to create healthy cellular responses.Whereas other aggravants (inflammation, chemicals, disruptors) can be called antagonists in their ability to increase inflammatory cascades within the body.

 

Studies on CBD oil and pain management have shown a great deal of promise. CBD can offer an alternative for people who have chronic pain and rely on more dangerous, habit-forming medications like opioids.